Never-Smokers Have Different Mutations in Genes Than Smokers


January 11, 2012

USA Today

Scientists who have started to identify genes and pathways associated with lung cancer in people who have never smoked say it's a first step in the potential development of new treatments.

Never-smokers -- people who've smoked fewer than 100 cigarettes over a lifetime -- account for about 10 percent of lung cancer cases.

But this group of lung cancer patients hasn't been studied as much as smokers who develop lung cancer, according to Timothy Whitsett, a senior postdoctoral fellow in the cancer and cell biology division at the Translational Genomics Research Institute in Phoenix... Read More